Gypsy Moth Productions

Testimonial

"No Longer In Service" examines the United States Postal Service's current challenges in a world where written communications may be on the way out, replaced by an on-line, E-mail driven paradigm. How did the U.S.P.S. go from being an incredibly large, very profitable business to its current money losing condition? Can it hope to survive, or is it doomed to extinction - as exemplified by exclusive footage taken inside the Old Chicago Post Office before it went on the auction block. Once the largest post office in the world, and the hub for the United States economy, it stands empty and derelict. Is this what the future holds for the U.S.P.S, or can it remake itself in a world driven by on-line shopping and bill paying.

When the U.S.P.S. closed the post office in a small rural Nevada town, the people living there struggle to keep the post office open at their own expense, as they feel it is a critical part of the fabric of their community. How they worked together, with the help of the state and federal representative, tells a powerful story of how important the post office can be in a small rural town, and how cost-cutting decisions made thousands of miles away can impact the way of life for people living in rural America.

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"No Longer In Service" 48 hour rental     $4.99 Download to own.                                      $19.99

The Post Office has always been instrumental in the development of technology because they were constantly seeking ways to deliver the mail quickly and efficiently. In early American aviation, there were no instruments that the pilot could use to navigate. Mail arrow beacons were used to direct the pilot. In 9 years the Post Office carried 300 million letters, over 16 million miles at a cost of 34 of its pilots killed and there by built the infrastructure that established American commercial aviation.

Review

No Longer In Service

 “No Longer In Service” – extremely interesting, well done piece. Congratulations.

World Wide Motion Picture Corporation

"No Longer In Service"   DVD                  $300.00     License for educational facilities.

"No Longer In Service", examines the United States Postal Service's current challenges in a world where written communication may be on the way out, replaced by an on-line, e-mail driven new paradigm. How did the U.S.P.S. go from being an incredibly large, very profitable business to its current money losing condition? Can it hope to survive, or is it doomed to extinction - as exemplified by exclusive footage taken inside the Old Chicago Post Office obtained before it went on the auction block. Once the largest post office in the world, and the hub for the United States economy, it stands empty and derelict. Is this what the future holds for the U.S.P.S., or can it remake itself in a world driven by on-line shopping and bill paying?


When the U.S.P.S. closed the post office in a small rural Nevada town, the people living there struggle to keep the post office open at their own expense, as they feel it is a critical part of the fabric of their community. How they work together, with the help of the state and federal representative, tells a powerful story of how important the post office can be in a small rural town, and how cost-cutting decisions made thousands of miles away can impact the way of life for people living in rural America.

No Longer In Service  DVD        $20.00 Plus Shipping

No Longer In Service is an intriguing look at the history and current plight of the U.S. Postal Service in the wake of technological changes brought about by the rise of e-mail and the internet, which have caused a decline in the need for regular mail service and resulted in post offices being closed across the nation, particularly in rural areas where the cost of delivering the mail exceeds the income that can be earned from it. The documentary raises important questions about how to provide for public services and who should pay for them, the role of the government and private businesses in the economy, and the impact of new technologies. The question and answer session with the film makers, Christine Lazzarini and Michael Morkin, was informative and engaging, and our students learned a lot from their presentation.  

          --Greta de Jong,PhD, Core Humanities Program, University of Nevada, Reno